The Television Concerts, 1948-52, Vol. 1

Deal Score0
Deal Score0

The Television Concerts, 1948-52, Vol. 1

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5 Comments
  1. As soon I receive this order from Moviemars, bought last July, I promise that I wil do my review here. I hope Moviemars fill his promises of delivering the item, already paid.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  2. This is my first purchase of the series and I love it. I plan to purchase all of them.

    He was such an extraordinary man/conductor. They have done a wonderful job of restoring these old televised series.

    I highly recommend these to anyone that enjoys his conducting and classical music.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  3. The performance of the Ninth Symphony is so moving, spiritual and stirring that if you are not brought to tears by the fourth movement, you are probably dead.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  4. This is a near priceless reproduction of the first two live Television Concerts, the all-Wagner performance of March 20, 1948 and the performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 on April 3, exactly two weeks after the Wagner concert.

    The Wagner concert is great, including the thrilling and intense Ride of the Valkyries to conclude, yet the shining star on this DVD is the Maestro’s performance of Beethoven. It is intense in the first two movements, peaceful while brisk in the Adagio movement, leading up to the glorious “Ode to Joy” theme. The opening movement is very fast, only 12:55, and scorches just about all contemporary and subsequent readings of this movement. At this pace, though, Toscanini conducts the climactic passage perfectly, with nearly unsurpassed fury and intensity which would make the Maestro Beethoven proud, and the movement closes out brilliantly, as well. The second movement continues on with a similar theme, which Toscanini conveys excellently as well.

    The third movement is where most conductors love to indulge in sentimentality where it was not intended, but Toscanini allows the music to flow and keeps it pressing forward beautifully. The final movement, though is where Toscanini truly shines, from the introduction of the “Ode to Joy” theme on to the end. Tempi still matter though, and the Maestro nails it, from the chorus singing in unison the first stanza on to the conclusion. The rousing Allegro energico section is one of the most memorable moments of the finale and the appropriate military-march tempo taken by Toscanini makes it this much better, and this march-style tempo is behind the concluding Prestissimo, which Toscanini gets right: a joyful march at the fastest pace a human drummer could go, which is what Beethoven envisioned. Start to finish, Toscanini’s 1948 performance is one of the very best performances of Symphony No. 9 of all-time.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  5. Telecast: 20 March, 1948 at NBC Studio 8-H, New York City

    Introduction to the concert

    Wagner

    Lohengrin ­ Prelude to Act III

    Tannhäuser ­ Overture & Bacchanale

    Siegfried ­ Forest Murmurs

    Götterdämmerung ­ Dawn & Siegfried’s Rhine Journey

    Die Walküre ­ Ride of the Valkyries

    NBC Symphony Orchestra

    Telecast: 3 April, 1948 at NBC Studio 8-H, New York City

    Introduction to the concert

    Beethoven

    Symphony No.9 in D minor, Op.125, ‘Choral’

    Anne McKnight ­ soprano · Jane Hobson ­ contralto

    Erwin Dillon ­ tenor · Norman Scott ­ bass

    Members of the Collegiate Chorale

    NBC Symphony Orchestra

    Rating: 5 / 5

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