Scrubs – The Complete First Season

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Deal Score0

  • Now relive all 24 episodes of the groundbreaking show’s highly acclaimed first season. With a host of great bonus features, including never-before-seen dream sequences and a fascinating retrospective documentary, this spectacular four-DVD set is off-the-charts entertainment you’ll want to watch over and over again. Joining the rumpled J.D. at Sacred Heart Hospital are fellow residents Chri

Description
Now relive all 24 episodes of the groundbreaking show’s highly acclaimed first season. With a host of great bonus features, including never-before-seen dream sequences and a fascinating retrospective documentary, this spectacular four-DVD set is off-the-charts entertainment you’ll want to watch over and over again. Joining the rumpled J.D. at Sacred Heart Hospital are fellow residents Chris Turk (Donald Faison, REMEMBER THE TITANS, FELICITY) — J.D.’s college buddy who is p… More >>

Scrubs – The Complete First Season

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5 Comments
  1. The late 1990s was a great time to experiment with the concept of a one-camera comedy. A few plucky storytellers were able to combine the “bardic” nature of dramatic TV with the “silliness” of the sitcom. Shows like “Sex and the City” and “Malcolm in the Middle” were complete shocks to the system, and their early seasons completely rocked. Their failings were that they depended too much on their “bardic” heritage and relied on narration (via voiceover or on-screen asides) to keep the story flowing–a crutch of television and movie storytelling. “Scrubs” monopolizes on this new style of one-camera comedy by pushing the “bardic” and “silly” aspects to their limits. This usually works in favor of the show, but there are undeniable drawbacks.

    The late 90s also saw the rise of New Wave Emo style, which eventually punctured TV with shows like “Ed” and “That 70s Show.” It’s nice that sensitive, wimpy whiteboys had outlets for their simpering, pathetic troubles, but it does not make for interesting television. In “Scrubs,” JD has countless wonderful and inspiring moments, but he also has irritating “Emo” moments. JD’s kvetching can be spot-on and charming one minute, and then–like the one-camera comedy often does–pushes it too far. His show-concluding “realizations” morally superior to everyone else’s, and considering that he’s the narrator, these “resolutions” often come out “godlike.” Though the rest of the cast is downright amazing, “Scrubs” is undeniably JD’s story, and hands agency to a white male archetype without making him suffer to earn it.
    Rating: 3 / 5

  2. This movie change my life, now everytime I look at my doctor, he looks like Zach Bacf. So when I ask him if he was Zach Barf, he said his name was DR. Shelly Fishman, MD.

    Afterward I changed my doctor because he look like Zach Barf and I was falling in love with him. So currently I am going out with Dr. Fishman, buy this movie and you will know what love is all about.

    + I also saw someone who looks like Dr. Reed, and Dr. Keiso.

    I think I am going fall in love with all of them!!

    !!It WILL change YOUR life forever !!

    Trust me
    Rating: 5 / 5

  3. I am sick of everyone telling me they like scrubs. I watched about six episodes, and didn’t even smile. This the same trendy, inside-joke comedy that now rules the airwaves. Unclever, conformist jokes and mindless viewers do not equal a good show. Bottom line: Cliche beyond beleif.
    Rating: 1 / 5

  4. I think the amount of exclamation points i left after the word YES should suffice in expressing my opinion of this show…That and the warm glow i now hold in my pants.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  5. One of the smartest shows on the air.

    The show airs on NBC in 16:9 widescreen high-definition, so why is the DVD only available in 1.33:1 “fullscreen” format?
    Rating: 4 / 5

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