Defiance

Deal Score0
Deal Score0

Product Description

Genre: Drama
Rating: R
Release Date: 2-JUN-2009
Media Type: Blu-RayAmazon.com
Three ferociously committed actors fill the roles of the Bielski brothers, Jewish partisans who escaped into the forests of Eastern Europe during the Second World War. Daniel Craig (taking a break from 007 duty) is Tuvia, the leader of a group of refugees who eventually number over a thousand; Liev Schreiber is Zus, the antagonistic warrio… More >>

Defiance

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5 Comments
  1. TIME TO GET over all of this and move on…..yes, a somewhat satisfactory film about human greed, suffering, greed, suffering, greed and more suffering – nothing really noble.

    Better? ‘THE VICTORS’ – ‘THE BRIGDE’ – all about the foolishness of empty promises ….meaning nothing.
    Rating: 1 / 5

  2. This is a terrible movie, here is the truth about it, the Bielskies a freedom fighting group, is stuck in the german wilderness and the leader are 2 jewish men who are trying to gather others. They commit many war crimes with their crowd. Some zionist jews produced this movie out of anger and are venting.
    Rating: 1 / 5

  3. The Bielski family collaborated with the Red Army when the Soviets invaded Poland on September 17,1939 Their situation was relatively comfortable. Polish Catholics were targeted by the NKVD and executed or sent to the gulags. However, Jews were generally grasped to the Soviet bosom and frequently were given positions of authority.

    When Hitler broke the Molotov-Ribbentrop treaaty on June 22. 1941, the Germans invaded the Russian occupied Nowogrodek region where the Bielski family lived and the Jews were treated badly by the Nazis, as the Polish Catholics were badly treated both by the Nazis and the Soviets.

    The Bielski Partisan group did little damage to the German army. They did, however, extort and terrorize the Christian population who were, like the Bielskis, Polish citizens. The murder of 128 Christians in the village of Naliboki is generally understood to have been a Bielski war crime, one of many. The Polish Catholics had formed an underground in 1939, the AK (home army) which actively fought both the Nazi and Soviet invaders at a cost of hundreds of thousands of Catholic lives. It did more damage to the Germans than partisan activities in any other country. At the end of World War II, the Bielski family was allowed to emigrate, and most finally wound up in the USA. Polish Catholics were not allowed to flee to the West but were subjected to 50 years of Soviet occupation, worse even than that of the Nazis. Surely better role models of Jewish freedom fighters could have been found than the Bielskis.
    Rating: 1 / 5

  4. I wanted to like this film. I love War Movies, I love Daniel Craig–he was great in “Munich”, and “Casino Royale”, he is the biggest Star in the film and..he’s the biggest diappointment. The story is good; Russian Jews banding together to suvive/fight the Germans in the forest behind enemy lines, with Craig, Liev Schriber, and Jamie Bell being the 3 Brothers leading the refugees. The problem is the movie starts off with no back story; it’s just Daniel Craig being thrust into the role of Leadership and on it goes and in the end it never really ‘goes’ anywhere. Craig is sometimes stong; sometimes confused; sometimes he just ‘checks out’ as the leader cause its ‘so hard’. His modern man, ‘stressed out, conflicted guy’ just doesnt fit a character in a 1942 WWII film, it seems totally out of place. Schriber is ok but not developed much as a chracter and Jamie Bell seems miscast as the youngest Brother. The action sequences are okay till Liv somehow comes out of an intense gun battle with machine guns with just his arm in a sling. In the end the story just doesn’t amount to much which is too bad because the movie is based on real events and those events were truly heroic.
    Rating: 1 / 5

  5. It’s very easy to assume that Defiance is a wish-fulfillment revenge narrative wherein we finally witness stories of common folks who resisted the Nazis with tooth and nail. A certain entertainment magazine reviewer blithely dismissed the entire film as too “Hollywood,” because Tuvia (Daniel Craig) murders the entire family who assisted in the Nazis in wiping out his family. The review’s assessment couldn’t be further from the truth.

    Defiance is the true story of Tuvia and Zus Bielski (Liev Schrieber), two brothers who lived on the fringes of polite Jewish society by surviving in the deep woods, more akin to bandits than heroes. Where Tuvia is cool-headed, Zus is dangerously violent. The two soon discover a widening circle of friends and distant relatives seeking their protection, until Tuvia is moved to rescue Jews from a ghetto. Now he has to contend with well-bred city folks who know nothing about surviving in the Russian winter.

    Defiance never glamorizes death. The Nazi attacks share less screen time, presumably because audiences need no convincing about the nature of their crimes. But even the Bielski retaliation against German troops is miserable — Germans plead for their lives even as they are executed. War, Defiance tells us, is reprehensible, and it is a task for rough men. The question is if rough men are responsible for protecting the weak. Why should soldiers protect civilians?

    Every ugly part of war is on full display here: defections, in-fighting, disease, starvation, alliances of convenience (between men and women, Russians and Jews), bigotry, incompetence, loss of faith, and yes, brutal, bloody revenge. By the end of the film, audiences are less likely to feel vindicated as they are disgusted by the places Defiance takes us. This is not a feel good film, not even as a revenge fantasy.

    Defiance doesn’t cover every angle. As criminals themselves, the Bielskis surely committed crimes we don’t see on screen (see the Wikipedia entry on the Bielski partisans for more). But it is hardly a glamorized portrayal of their experience.

    Rating: 3 / 5

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