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Anonymous Says, in 1-13-2010 at 21:59:23 from     

“Shine on your shoes” song is very cool, and I also liked “Triplets” which I have seen Danny Kaye sing in a mirrior, but all in all “The Bandwagon” is confusing and talent is wasted fluently by namely, Nanette What’s-her-name, and Fred Astaire. The “Girl Hunt” number” was funny in it’s stupidness.
Rating: 2 / 5

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Brian Hulett Says, in 1-14-2010 at 00:25:58 from     

“The Band Wagon” is one of the NY Times’ “1000 Best Films Ever Made,” and I’ve seen about 300 of them. You may be a big fan of the traditional Hollywood musical, and if so, this is your kind of film. Personally the list of such films I’ve enjoyed is quite short, and it doesn’t include “The Band Wagon.” This makes me sad, having just enjoyed Fred & Ginger’s 1936 classic “Swing Time” from the NY Times list. However, where that film and Gene Kelly’s “Singin’ In the Rain” excel by sparkling between the song & dance numbers, “The Band Wagon” lags. It’s a shame, because there are a couple of brilliant moments here, the sparkling “Shoe Shine” dance on a set representing 42nd Street and a lovely number with Cyd Charisse to “Dancing In the Dark.” Other than that, and other than Jack Buchanan’s comical turn as a Master Thespian, the whole thing just leaves me flat, especially the blah romance and idiotically cornball ending. Give me “Fiddler On the Roof” or those named above any day over this!
Rating: 2 / 5

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David Cady Says, in 1-14-2010 at 02:06:58 from     

…this is one of the greatest musical films ever made. But I just can’t warm up to it the way I do to “Singing in the Rain” or “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers.” The Dietz and Schwartz songs are marvelous, and Michael Kidd has done a great job with a number of them (particularly “Dancing in the Dark” and The Girl Hunt Ballet,” admittedly two classic film/dance sequences), but the human story of “The Band Wagon” leaves me cold. Astaire is less convincing as a romantic lead than in his earlier films, and I find Levant and Fabray more annoying than fun. And there’s an odd, fake showbiz veneer to the whole thing that reduces the characters to archtypes and prevents our getting close to or caring about any of them. OK, it’s only a movie, but the best of the Hollywood musicals engage our hearts as well as our tapping toes. (Think about how much your heart aches along with Judy Garland’s in “Meet Me in St. Louis” or “In the Good Old Summertime.”) For me, “The Band Wagon” never goes that extra step.
Rating: 3 / 5

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David W. Leventhal Says, in 1-14-2010 at 03:32:10 from     

You sent the product to the wrong address where it was returned to you as undeliveraable. We had typed in that it should be sent to our winter address and not our home address in PA. So, you got it back and alledgedly have given us credit on our MC. Since then we have responded to your e-mails and requested that you re-enter the order and send it to our current quarters to no avail. This has not been a good experience. Fortunately, TCM was playing the movie the other morning and we copied it on VHS and we have found someone who will copy the particular scene that we need to practice for our show onto another tape and we don’t need you now.
Rating: 3 / 5

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Anonymous Says, in 1-14-2010 at 05:48:45 from     

I’m a person who has viewed TONS of old movie musials – everything from Silk Stockings to Born To Dance, and I must say that although there was an INCREDIBLE amount of talent present in this film: Vincente Minelli, Fred Astaire, Cyd Charisse, Nanette Fabray, Oscar Levante, Michael Kidd, etc. it was not one of the greatest musicals, as most say. In fact, I’m not a huge fan of it. You see, everything was excellent: the script, the songs, the dances – all were very well done, but the whole project lacked that special spark that makes a musical great! For one thing, I wanted more dances! The Girl Hunt ballet and Dancing In The Dark were wonderful! But in my opinion there should have been another Cyd and Fred number! That’s Entertainment is, I grant you, a good song, but it can get on your nerves quite easily, and is probably the most over-played song in movie musical history. And why did they cut out all those numbers? Two Faced Woman, which I haven’t seen, sounds like it would be a zesty, energetic Charisse number that the film completely lacked! Oh sure you had ‘New Sun In The Sky’, but it was more a singing number than a dancing number, which makes no sense when you consider that Cyd Charisse was one of the best dancers Hollywood ever possessed – not a singer! Why focus a number on a dubbed voice? It’s beyond me to figure out why. The picture needed a Charisse number, like ‘Red Blues’ from Silk Stockings, and ‘Two Faced Woman’ sounds like it would be just the ticket! I suppose what I’m trying to say is that I wanted more dancing numbers. ‘A Shine On Your Shoes’ was a fun number, and I loved it the first couple times I saw it, but by the third time you begin to get tired of the two minutes Fred Astaire spends saying: “Got shine on my shoes” – and he’s not even REALLY dancing while saying that. I know he wasn’t as spry as he was in the Fred And Ginger movies, but The Girl Hunt ballet proves that he could still dance as only Fred Astaire could – so why didn’t they have another great Astaire number in the film? Overall, however, the film lacked that special spark, that chemistry that makes a film great! In the book: MGMs Greatest Musicals, The Arthur Freed Unit, it describes how terrible the filming of this picture was. Buchanan was in pain from a dental operation, and was terrified of Fred Astaire; Cyd Charisse, sensitive to the mood on the set, stayed aloof; Levante, recovering from a heart attack, was even more difficult than ever; no one talked to Fabray, but then, no one talked to anyone; Folsey, the cameraman, was blamed for delay and was fired; and Minnelli, blessed with blinders, did nothing about the terrible atmosphere and situation. – With all these things going on, one could hardly expect ‘the magic’ to be present. It was, however, a fun, bright film filled with many good numbers and that wonderful speech Astaire makes when he becomes to fed up with the production, (I absolutely adore that scene). So, yes, I do recommend this film to musical fans and film buffs; it was, after all, a good movie. I suppose my expectations were too high. I read in so many reviews that this was the greatest musical ever made, (which I strongly disagree with and I wonder if these people have seen Singin In the Rain), and that it was the best role Astaire ever played. (I don’t know, my favourite Astaire roles are in Silk Stockings and Barkleys on Broadway, and, of course, Swing Time.) I expected to be blown away by this movie … and I wasn’t. Yes, it was a good way to spend two hours, but it is a VERY poor cousin to Singin’ In The Rain. However, I do recommend you buy it, if for nothing else than you can watch ‘Dancing In The Dark’ and ‘The Girl Hunt’ over and over again.
Rating: 3 / 5

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