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John D. Aldridge Says, in 1-17-2010 at 11:37:07 from     

The Route 66 theme music always puts me into a semi trance. Sort of a blend of youth and freedom of the road, with some nostalgia for simpler times thrown in. This was a well made show, back when there were real stories to be told, and opportunities for a guest star to create a memorable character. The on the road location photography was always first class, especially considering the speedy production requirements of a weekly show. The accross the country settings are a time machine back to a more innocent America. The two leads are engaging. The Corvette looks like a future mobile compared to all the lumbering bloated sedans of that era. I have a giant TV (a gift), and the 16X9 format looks good on my screen, more the cinematic look which I like. Possibly the 16X9 format seems “movie”, big and important, rather than TV 4X5 format which screams TV and disposable. And yes sometimes the framing of head closeups are framed too high or too low…but just a little and not really jarring…and really only occur just a few times during any particular show. Go ahead and enjoy this time machine, I have.
Rating: 4 / 5

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Elwyn J. Richards Says, in 1-17-2010 at 14:07:46 from     

Before I purchased this product from Amazon I hadn’t seen any episode of

Route 66 since it was last shown on British television in the early 1960’s. I have to say that I enjoyed watching the episodes of Route 66 again as it brought back so many wonderful memories for me. I am so thankful that a company like Amazon exists so that the classic tv series of the 50’s and 60’s can be enjoyed again by all us “oldies”. Thank you Amazon.
Rating: 4 / 5

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George B. Sears Says, in 1-17-2010 at 16:55:58 from     

I’m not sure I understand the controversy on the cropping. Basically, the series was filmed in 35mm, which is 3:2. The standard TV is 4:3. They tried to adapt the film to 16:9, or HD widescreen. The 3:2 is 16:10.6, so there’s too much picture at 16:9. They are not stretching anything. They simple centered the vertical area in each scene. So, as they admit, sometimes heads are chopped. But, given the 35mm frame, it is not natural on a 4:3 either. The video is excellent, to me, and what they did was the proper thing to do with the quality film they had.

That aside, this is a great drama, real stories, good acting. There is a lot of range to the stories. The opener is about an emotionally spent crop duster. It’s a little overdone, but interesting. There is a great episode about a fighter with Ed Asner and Darren McGavin. Many of the shows are basic, about faith, hope, and charity. The one about the school in New Mexico is almost astonishing.

It’s a little bit of work to watch drama from this period, but it may outshine the present focus on large doses of sex, violence, and extreme mental disorder.

The endings in this show are kind of abrupt. The story is resolved and the two guys hop in the car. That’s probably more honest, for a show about drifters. This was a serious road trip. The pair is always taking on other people’s problems. They even joke about it, at times. But there is always some kind of emotional situation that has to be resolved, and they are stuck resolving it. In some cases these are very serious bits of drama, some truly bad people. But it’s also a fairly hopeful world where there is a sense that getting involved is still reasonable.

So there is a lot to this show and I think people should accept the decision on the video sizing. It’s not really the point
Rating: 5 / 5

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D. S. Wymore Says, in 1-17-2010 at 18:18:36 from     

After buying the first volume of this set, I had to buy the second simply because I wanted to watch the further adventures of Tod, Buz and the Corvette. I believe this is one of the few television programs ever filmed on actual locations – from Reno to Cleveland and beyond. Highly unusual for 1960 and highly unusual for 2008. The locations add a reality and a credibility to the series that filming solely in California or on a studio backlot lack. Yes, it’s in black and white but who cares? Though the acting is a little dated, the writing is far better than most television these days. Tod and Buz find a variety of adventures through jobs, girls, bad people, and occasional fist fights. To my amazement, there’s even an episode where they are really ticked off at each other, resulting in a fist fight. I would recommend both volumes.
Rating: 5 / 5

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AZ Ranman Says, in 1-17-2010 at 19:39:08 from     

For a nostalgic look back at the USA circa 1960, you can’t do any better than Route 66. Every episode is a look at a new location and the scenery, cars, buildings, dress, and people are like a living postcard from the era. Both Volume 1 & 2 are presented different than the 11 Classic episodes DVD released earlier in that there are no commercial interuptions. The commercials are combined into their own segment. I only hope the rest of the series is released soon, as those of us who loved the series can’t get enough. Take a trip on Route 66!
Rating: 5 / 5

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