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Anonymous Says, in 1-14-2010 at 07:59:38 from     

Ugh i was so mad! I thought it was going to be a good funny yet serious movie, but it was horrible. First when i was watching it i thought it was about the fat guy then all the sudden its about the journalist, what the heck i didnt follow that story. It should have just ended right when boot camp was over.
Rating: 1 / 5

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B. Weaver Says, in 1-14-2010 at 10:18:49 from     

Oh my God! I am so sick of hearing about how realistic the Paris Island segment is and what a great job R. Lee Ermey did playing the drill instructor. I’ve never seen any portrayal of military basic trainiing that was terribly realistic. The best two would have to be “The D.I.” starring Jack Webb, and “The Boys in Company C.” (Featuring Ermey in what I consider to be a MUCH better portrayal.) The one flaw I see popping up again and again with this particular theme is the idea of a single instructor training the whole group by himself. You see that in movies like “Private Benjamin” and “An Officer and a Gentleman.” (While I’m at it, why is a Marine NCO training Naval officer candidates? Is that how they do it? I don’t know.) In FMJ there are two other D.I.s, but they never open their mouths. In real military training you get off the bus and there are between eight and ten guys yelling at you constantly. And those “pregnant pauses” where some D.I. slowly and silently paces around in front of the trainees until he singles one out, then intimidates them in low hushed tones may make for good cinema, but in the real world the yelling is loud, constant, and usually refering to the speed with which the recruits are moving. (Too slow, of course.)

Secondly, as to Ermey’s portrayal of a Marine D.I., like I said, he was better in “Company C.” In that movie you saw a guy who genuinely cared about what he was doing. He was very concerned with doing a good job because he knew he would be sending these guys to Vietnam. Gunnery Sergeant Hartman of FMJ, on the other hand, was a bullying loud-mouthed jerk who seemed incapable of using contractions in his speech. Any D.I. who handled recruits like that would be sacked. He singled out one guy because he was a screw-up, then kicked his ass for eight weeks without making any real effort to help him. I guarantee that in any group of guys that size you are going to have more than one problem child and the D.I.’s job is to identify the problem with them and fix them. When “Pyle” was climbing the obstacle and froze up at the top, Ermey yelled “Then QUIT! You (bleepedy blah, blah, blah)! Get the f— off of my obstacle!” A real D.I. would have made him climb over and not let him quit.

Finally, they don’t do much real training in FMJ. You see them marching, running, doing some PT and running across a muddy field. They are shown at the confidence course and one short scene at the rifle range. But what about instruction in various weapons? The grenade range? What about lectures on mine emplacement, construction of fighting positions, and vehicle identification? What about training in manouver under fire, tactical formations, map reading? I know they had a limited amount of time, but I would like to see a movie about Marine Recruit Training that puts more emphasis on those things instead of the pseudo-ideological b.s.
Rating: 3 / 5

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Rodney D. Lewis Says, in 1-14-2010 at 12:24:18 from     

I should have known better, I do not like Kubrick’s movies, I thought Space Odyssey 2001 was incomprehensible and have shied away from his stuff ever since. But being a war movie fan, I weakened and paid the price, a waste of time, looks like most of it was shot on the back lot in England. The name of the movie was good and the graphic on the DVD cover , that’s the best I can say about it.
Rating: 1 / 5

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Anonymous Says, in 1-14-2010 at 13:34:54 from     

DO YOU WANT TO SEE A GOOD WAR FILM. SEE SAVING PRIVATE RYAN OR APOCLYPSE NOW OR WHEN TRUMPETS FADE OR SCHINDLER’S LIST.
Rating: 1 / 5

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Koala Syd Says, in 1-14-2010 at 14:18:21 from     

I do not wish to compare this movie to other films about the Vietnam War — I’ll leave that to others who have seen a number of these films or have themselves been war veterans. What I do want to talk about is the horrendously psychological brutal and vicious treatment of the soldiers, acted out in the first half of the film, as they begin their training, prior to being sent off to war. Its no big secret that young recruits are put through intense training and perhaps this is necessary to a certain point in order to properly prepare them for eventual battle. That said, the drill sgt in this film was more than brutal — he was unnecessarily sadistic in his treatment of these young men, and this was of course most prominent with his treatment of Private Gomer Pyle.

It is with reference to the above, though, that I would still probably recommend this film to students studying psychology, sociology and even criminal justice. The intense character study that we witness, involving the psychological breakdown of a young, non-intellectual-type soldier and the sadistically abusive treatment he endures at the hands (or mouth, I suppose) of his drill sgt can be a learning experience. I have a Masters degree in Psychology and one in Counseling as well so that might explain the angle I’m approaching all of this from. Motivating these young men is one thing, but psychologically and sadistically abusing them is something else altogether. We’ve all heard stories about sports dads, coaches, stage moms, and other authoritarian-type figures abusing their power. Seems that every movie involving a coach or authoritative military figure has to have that character constantly referring to his men as “ladies” or “girls.” I’m not saying this is a ridiculous thing to do because I am a female, but rather because it IS a ridiculous and childish approach to motivating anyone. No one, including young soldiers, needs to be abused in this manner and what can happen as a result of this type of unnecessary abuse is clearly depicted in Full Metal Jacket. In fact, all one has to do is turn to the nightly news to find real life circumstances of a similar nature.

Rating: 3 / 5

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