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Anonymous Says, in 2-1-2010 at 21:04:17 from     

Mr. Bruce lee is a tremendous martial artist but when it comes to filming sction sequences, he looks like a pile of conjiled sugar, whew! Hot damn! Jackie chan is better, he kicks yo mamma ’round the de world! ANYWAY BRUCE SHOULD, I HOPE HE DOES SOON!
Rating: 1 / 5

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Thierry Montreuil Says, in 2-1-2010 at 21:59:30 from     

This will maybe hurt Bruce lee Fan but this movie is not surviving over the ages and will find poor interest for new generation.This look like an old james bond movie of the sixties with Sean Connery.

This is totlay oldfashioned and we have done much more better since.

As far as High definition this is maybe a good thing for the purpose of restoring the film and make it viewable…but this is surely not the kind of movie you will have to play to impress your neighbors or friends about your brand new last HD dvd or tv…

The sound has absolutly no surround and is mostly based on central speaker.

For Bruce lee fans exclusively.
Rating: 2 / 5

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S. Alix Says, in 2-1-2010 at 23:34:22 from     

Its funny how ‘classics’ can be so damn over rated. This movie really isn’t that good, but it shows where the creators of MOrtal Kombat stole there idea from. The movie was boring, the fight scenes were so cheap and not even impressive. With his reputation, I trust that Bruce Lee has done more impressive stuff than this. Even the legendary final end scenes with the mirrors, never amounted to anything. I’ll stick with Drunken Master II as the best martial arts film of all time, this movie is just embarassing to watch.
Rating: 1 / 5

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Anticlimacus Says, in 2-2-2010 at 02:26:57 from     

If there’s one thing I personally hate with every ounce of my body, it’s a mediocre film that gets propped up on an undeserving pedestal for nostalgic reasons. Why? Because frequently the film’s proponents will mask their nostalgia by magically transforming mediocrity into greatness with their rose-colored glasses. Meanwhile, these fanatics will demean other movies that are objectively better than their beloved film for no valid reason. Yes, I know that the enjoyability of a movie is subjective to each viewer, but the most superlative claims made by these fanatics venture dangerously into assertions of objective fact.

Bruce Lee fans are a perfect example. While reading comments for “Enter the Dragon”, I hear endless put downs for every martial arts movie that doesn’t star Bruce Lee. Considering the fact that none of his movies ever succeeded to crack the ceiling of mediocrity, a non-nostalgic observer (absent of brainwashing) can only conclude that these are certifiable lunatics trying to convince themselves that “Enter the Dragon” is a great movie, either due to nostalgic reasons or coersive pressuring from media (and fanboys) to jump on a bandwagon with square wheels.

As a fan of martial arts cinema, I can ignore a mediocre script, wooden acting, and an inept storyline if the film gives me what I want in terms of action. “Enter the Dragon” fails to provide what it so desperately attempts to accomplish: well-choreographed, entertaining fight scenes.

Some Bruce Lee lunatics start their reviews by saying that the opening fight is a “brilliant sequence of moves.” I can only respond to this as I would someone who says that the sun is black – shake my head in disbelief and slowly walk away in fear of being assaulted. When one watches this scene (as with most of Bruce’s fights), there is a noticeable lack of two things: combinations and countermoves. Bruce will typically engage in a series of one-hit exchanges with his opponents while mixing in a few three-move combos. Meanwhile, his opponents act like sparring dummies to be owned as necessary. While this has the potential to work in a one-vs-many scene, it simply doesn’t work in a one-on-one scene. If you think that the beginning fight in “Enter the Dragon” is “brilliant”, then you need to watch the Wu Jing/Andy On exchange in “Fatal Contact” (2006) for an example of a truly scintillating martial arts fight with combinations and countermoves executed with great speed and precision. If you still think the Bruce Lee/Sammo Hung fight is better, please seek psychological counseling immediately.

Afterward the viewer is treated to some lame fights with John Saxon, Jim Kelly, and a Chinese lady, none of which look convincing on screen. After some incredibly bloated and overly long shots of boats on water (as well as some partying) we finally get to see Bruce do something again. This time, he goes stealth and takes out a few guards using nothing more than a few incredibly basic punches and chops. Mediocrity at its finest.

Later on, Bruce goes stealth again but must now deal with a few dozen baddies in what many lunatics claim to be a spectacular one-against-many scene. In all honesty, I thought it was good and entertaining, with a bit of welcomed variety in terms of weaponry and moves. However, at least 70% of the baddies were dispatched with a simple fist to the face, which undermines this scene from being anything more than “good.” If you think this one-against-many fight was “spectacular”, then you need to watch the Tony Jaa finale in “Tom Yum Goong” (2005), where he dispatches over 40 guys using over 30 different strikes, holds, and take-downs. The sheer variety of that scene easily overpowers anything Bruce Lee ever did. If you still think the Bruce Lee scene was better, please look under “Psychiatrist” in your Yellow Pages.

We finally come to an overrated finale where Bruce takes out 90% of his opponents using the same exact kick and punch. Virtually no effort was put into the fight choreography, and it’s obvious to anyone without a platinum membership to Rose Colored Glasses, Inc. It gets a little better when Bruce spars with the main villain, but the all-too-common shortcomings of Bruce Lee fights – the lack of combos and counterattacks – rears its ugly head even here. Sure, there are a few good exchanges, but for the most part it’s incredibly bland (Bruce’s slow-mo jump kick being a case in point) and the actor playing the villain is just too slow and unconvincing. Unlike Bruce’s other films (e.g., “Way of the Dragon”), they had other credible stuntmen and martial artists in this movie. Why not choose a more athletic lead antagonist (Jackie Chan, Sammo Hung, etc.) to provide for some sparks? As is, it’s a decent but disappointing scene that’s very drawn out with lots of unnecessary slow motion.

Now, I’m familiar with the dangers of expressing an unpopular viewpoint in the realm of movies, and I am convinced that Bruce Lee fanatics have unknowingly established an organized religion of sorts that will stop at nothing to insult and demean anyone who doesn’t like Bruce’s movies – one may as well call it the “Cinematic Inquisition.” Don’t misunderstand me though. I have a great deal of respect for Bruce Lee as an intelligent person and an exceptional martial artist, but whether or not his movies are entertaining is a completely different issue altogether. The fact still remains that we have an incredible martial artist in middling action films.
Rating: 1 / 5

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Jandor Says, in 2-2-2010 at 03:03:45 from     

Thanks to this … were “The Game Of Death” never finished by Bruce. The only scene worth to watch in this one is Bruce’s incredibly fast backhand when he competes with Bob Wall. Otherwise its a bad martil arts movie and doesnt even compare with “Way Of The Dragon”, Bruce Lee’s best.
Rating: 2 / 5

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