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Anonymous Says, in 1-26-2010 at 03:29:56 from     

I thought Baker would NEVER leave…his era is interminable, it just goes on and on and on and on….argh!
With this story, second in the brilliant Master trilogy (the first really deacent thing in Tom Baker’s era in four years!!!)
we finally get rid of him. The story is so cool and does such a good job that we actually almost feel sad for a minute there, but its a massive releif when the sod fianlly pisses off once and for all so a good era can begin and the brilliant Peter Davison takes over. No more pulling faces, forced grins, bad puns, unfunny attempts at humor “Don’t wana lose my arm, rather attached to it, so handy!” (yeah, right!) just a cool hero with real emotional depth and an occasional dangerous edge (shoots door open with flintlock and says “I never miss..”). And no more shouting at Leela and K-9 to “shut up” every five minutes to remind us that he has “authority”. Yup, authority! “Leela, tell your friend to shut up!” “Leela, order K-9 to tell you to shut up” “No, shut up, K-9, listen… we’ll finish that game of chess now.” Yeah, I’m glad to see the back of him, good bye Thomas, don’t let the door hit you in the ass on the way out! Peter Davsion has finally arrived, long live Peter Davsion, the real King of Dr.Who!
Rating: 2 / 5

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Anonymous Says, in 1-26-2010 at 04:11:37 from     

Logopolis is a 1 star movie and unmoving. Its plot, especially in the first half, is extremely weak. It should have been called “Measuring the Tardis”. Again, there are serious problems with the plot. For instance, Logopolis is not even mentioned in the first half. There are no references to it at all. Instead, this is all that happens. The Doctor is rude to Adric repeatedly. Adric is obedient, but resentful. The Tardis is on Earth. The tardis is in the process of being measured when something becomes horribly wrong. The Doctor and Adric investigate the disturbance. The Doctor says something which sums up this movie by saying: “We’ll never get out of it.” He means an infinite regression, but he could also mean the movie.

Then, Tegan, a flight attendant, wanders inexplicably into the Tardis. Obviously, this extra-dimensional device is completely beyond her experience, but she enters it anyway. Further weakening this plausibility, Tegan is hardly foolhardy or excessively courageous, and the Tardis is completely deserted and silent. There is never any reasonable explanation why a basically normal flight attendant would wander into an obviously extra-terrestrial craft with neither hesitation nor caution. Reality flies out the window.

Continuing with the “plot”, the Doctor measures the Tardis. This is not particularly exciting. Interspersed with the measuring is a murder and a virtual kidnapping of Tegan. After Tegan is in the Tardis, the Master torments her with “crazy laughing”. It is more depressing and irritating than crazy to the audience, however.

Thus, this is a very long and very boring movie. It is certainly no 5-stars movie. At length, then, nothing happens. Nothing worthy of note. A couple of insignificant people die, and the Tardis is measured, and we find out that something is wrong, but it stirs no interest. The murders are bloodless and instant. Tegan’s wandering is tedious. So is the infinite measuring.

So what is good about Logopolis? The second half. In the second half, it becomes far more interesting. Viewers should fast-forward past the first half. Finally, a stirring plot is seen. The Master is on Logopolis. He plans to kill off the people to get them to bend to his will. Just what his will is, is not really clear. What is clear is that the Master is a megalomaniac. Equally clear is that he does not understand the horrendous consequences of his actions. Further, the Master seriously botches his extortion attempt when he kills off one Logopolitan too many and the universe starts to blow up. The Master says of this ever-accelerating death of the entire universe: “Horrible.”

Then, when all the Logopolitans are dead, and the universe is literally falling apart, the Master and the Doctor have to join forces to stop the universe from dying. The Master’s amusement at this alliance and the Doctor’s obvious disgust with this hardened criminal, makes the story interesting.

An interesting sidenote is the addition of Nyssa. Since the Master murdered her father, he cons her into thinking he’s her father. But he’s not. She says of the Master: “But Father, you’re so cold.” Several murders later, he forces Nyssa to choke Adric, although her murder device malfunctions.

Also, Logopolis is a movie of ideas. The idea explored here is that mathematics represent reality. Changing mathematics changes reality. Or rather, changing mathematics slightly, then completely destroys the entire universe. Shows like this live or die according to the interest their idea evokes. So is this idea interesting? Not really, as the idea is presented. Pure mathematical theory is rarely interesting. So a show based on pure mathematical theory is unlikely to be interesting, either. Antimatter is interesting. So is atomic power. So are alternate universes and moral lessons. Mathematical theory, pure mathematics, simply does not have stirring power.

If someone must buy this movie, the viewer is well-advised to skip the first half. Again, it is long and boring. Virtually nothing happens. The second half is in complete contrast. It is exciting. It does have a point. If someone buys this movie, they should do it for the second half. But then Logopolis disappoints the audience yet again.

The ending is extremely lifeless and unengaging. Tom Baker is killed by falling off a building and is then replaced by a grinning (!) Peter Davison. Nyssa, Tegan, and Adric are overcome with the same sorrow that the audience experiences. But, of course, there is a lot more sorrow on the part of the audience. The audience knows that this sorrow is for Tom Baker, because he was an entertaining and convincing Doctor Who, and also because Peter Davison becomes the Doctor. Everyone knows how fun, engaging, and friendly he was.
Rating: 1 / 5

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John Liosatos Says, in 1-26-2010 at 05:37:16 from     

I never really cared for this story as it marks the end of two eras, one being Tom Baker’s long, illustrious reign as the Doctor, and the other being the best Doctor Who decade. Gone is the trademark humor from Baker, to be replaced by mournful brooding. Now the show enters its most controversial decade, the John-Nathan-Turner-influenced 80s. Peter Davison and Colin Baker are good, but the last one leaves something to be desired, with poor stories. In addition, Anthony Ainley is a poor substitute for the late great Roger Delgado.

Rating: 3 / 5

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MasterOfWho Says, in 1-26-2010 at 08:21:16 from     

Not only is this a regeneration episode which would classify it as a must have, it is an excellent story. The end of the universe created by our own ignorance and arogance. Excellent social and cool scientific theory’s galore. Good style, effects, and an excellent cast of characters. This video invites you to feel as if part of the action.
Rating: 5 / 5

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Anonymous Says, in 1-26-2010 at 09:43:15 from     

Tom Baker’s last episode is a good one, as he scrambles to prevent the Master from wrecking the stability of the universe. An intelligent plot and subtle score help to make this a memorable story, though Adric and Tegan drag the story down a bit. Probably the second best DW closing story, behind Caves of Androzani. The only real downside is that Tom should have left the show about three seasons earlier :).
Rating: 4 / 5

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